Physicist Blanton on Mapping the Universe —And What 11 Billion Years of History Can Tell Us, April 26


NYU physicist Michael Blanton will deliver “Mapping the Universe with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey,” on Fri., April 26, 4-5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology.

Physicist Blanton on Mapping the Universe —And What 11 Billion Years of History Can Tell Us, April 26
NYU physicist Michael Blanton will deliver “Mapping the Universe with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey,” on Fri., April 26, 4-5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (CGSB) Auditorium. He and his colleagues were behind the creation of the largest-ever digital color image of the sky, which was released by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The trillion-pixel image is comprised of photographs taken by a 2.5 meter telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico and covers one-third of the night sky. The images reveal galaxies above both northern (above) and southern (below) hemispheres.

New York University physicist Michael Blanton will deliver “Mapping the Universe with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey,” on Fri., April 26, 4-5:30 p.m. at NYU’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (CGSB) Auditorium (12 Waverly Place, between Greene and Mercer Streets).

The lecture is part of NYU’s “Science on the Square,” a series of lectures focusing on scientific topics of interest to the general public and sponsored by NYU’s Dean for Science.

Blanton was part of a team that constructed the largest-ever three-dimensional map, produced by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, of massive galaxies and distant black holes using data from the Sloan Foundation Telescope at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico. The map will help the investigation of the mysterious “dark matter” and “dark energy” that make up 96 percent of the universe—and allow scientists to retrace the history of the universe over the last 11 billion years. In his lecture, Blanton, an associate professor in NYU’s Department of Physics, will describe how the survey works and what scientists have already learned from it.

The lecture is free and open to the public. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. For more information, call 212.998.3800. Reporters interested in attending must RSVP to James Devitt, NYU’s Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu. Subways: N/R [8th Street], 6 [Astor Place].

 

“Mapping the Universe with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey,” on Fri., April 26

Press Contact

James Devitt
James Devitt
(212) 998-6808