“Decline in Russian- American Relations?” to Feature Senator Bill Bradley, US Ambassador to Soviet Union Jack Matlock, Others—April 9


New York University will host “The Decline of Russian-American Relations: Does the Reset Begin at Home?” a panel discussion featuring former U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Bill Bradley and Jack Matlock, former U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union, on Tues., April 9.

“Decline in Russian-American Relations?” to Feature Bill Bradley, US Ambassador to Soviet Union Matlock—April 9
NYU will host “The Decline of Russian-American Relations: Does the Reset Begin at Home?” a panel discussion featuring former U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Bill Bradley, above, and Jack Matlock, former U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union, on Tues., April 9, 3-5 p.m., at NYU’s Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life. From the lens of George Kalinsky.

New York University will host “The Decline of Russian-American Relations: Does the Reset Begin at Home?” a panel discussion featuring former U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Bill Bradley and Jack Matlock, former U.S. ambassador to the Soviet Union, on Tues., April 9, 3-5 p.m., at NYU’s Bronfman Center for Jewish Student Life, 7 East 10th Street, 5th Floor [between Fifth Avenue and University Place].

Panelists will also include Boris Jordan, former director general of Russia’s NTV and founder of Renaissance Capital, and NYU’s Stephen Cohen, a professor emeritus at NYU and Princeton, who has authored several books on the topic: Bukharin and the Bolshevik Revolution: A Political Biography; Rethinking the Soviet Experience: Politics and History Since 1917; Sovieticus: American and Soviet Realities; Failed Crusade: America and the Tragedy of Post-Communist Russia; Soviet Fates and Lost Alternatives; and The Victims Return: Survivors of the Gulag after Stalin.

Russian-American relations have been in decline for several years, with U.S. voices aimed at both a muscular and uncooperative Russian stance abroad and civil rights abuses at home and Russians concerned about U.S. unilateralism and the absence of reciprocity. The panel brings together leading experts who have had a hand in the evolution of Russian-American relations over many decades. They continue to be active in Russian-American business and cultural affairs and opinion-making. The panelists will comment on several aspects of this topic, including: the evolution of Russian-American relations since 1991; the source of the decline in those relations; and alternative ways of conducting Russian-America relations in the future.

The event, co-sponsored by the university’s Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia and the Alexander Hamilton Center for Political Economy, is free and open to the public. RSVP by calling 212.992.6575 or by clicking here. Subways: 6 (Astor Place); N, R (8th Street). Reporters wishing to attend must RSVP to James Devitt, NYU’s Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu.

EDITOR’S NOTE
The Jordan Center for the Advanced Study of Russia undertakes to make Russia intrinsic to all aspects of scholarly investigation: from politics to literature, economics to anthropology, history to visual culture. Joining the ranks of US and western universities with distinguished traditions of inquiry and expertise on matters Russian and Soviet, the Center is distinguished by its particular mission of situating Russia in a global context. We aim both to help educate
Russia specialists on the interconnectedness of Russia with the world and to remind other fields of Russia’s ubiquity. While recognizing that any country is best understood as part of a global economy, culture, and politics, the Center works to ensure that Russia’s dramatic and enduring influence is an integral part of every conversation.

The Alexander Hamilton Center for Political Economy at New York University, founded and directed by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, uses modern political economy approaches based in logic and evidence to find answers to contemporary public policy problems. The Center achieves this goal by providing an open non-partisan forum to debate solutions for public policy problems. Its teaching and research functions emphasize such considerations as the design of governing institutions, the development and distribution of human capital, and the means by which fundamental policy issues can be resolved or advanced through the promotion of efficient and effective solutions that are sensitive to political, economic, and social realities.

Press Contact

James Devitt
James Devitt
(212) 998-6808