Shedlin and Anastasi Analyze Use of Alternative Medicines for HIV Patients

College of Nursing researchers Michele G. Shedlin and Joyce K. Anastasi published a paper, “Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicines and Supplements by Mexican-Origin Patients in a U.S.–Mexico Border HIV Clinic,” in the online version of the Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care.

Complementary and alternative medicines and therapies are often used to improve or maintain overall health and to relieve the side effects of conventional treatments or symptoms associated with chronic illnesses such as HIV infection. They can be categorized into mind–body therapies such as yoga and meditation; natural products such as botanicals, vitamins, and minerals; body-based therapies such as massage; and culturally based healing traditions.

The researchers drew data from a study investigating the influence of institutional and psychosocial factors on adherence to antiretroviral medications by Mexican-origin persons living with HIV on the U.S.–Mexico border and seeking treatment at a clinic in El Paso, Texas.

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