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NYU Professors Garland and Young Elected British Academy Fellows

July 19, 2013
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New York University professors David Garland and Robert Young have been elected to the British Academy as Corresponding Fellows, the London-based organization announced this week.

Corresponding Fellow is the designation given to those chosen from universities outside the United Kingdom. The 42 new Fellows from UK universities and the 15 new Corresponding Fellows were selected “for their outstanding research and work across the humanities and social sciences,” the Academy said in its announcement.

“The humanities and social sciences celebrate the study of what it means to be human and how we relate to the world around us,” said Professor Lord Nicholas Stern, new president of the British Academy. “They can also help us tackle many of the challenges faced in this country and the world as a whole. Our new Fellows, from across the UK and world, are world-class experts in the humanities and social sciences and can play a vital role in sustaining the Academy’s activities—helping select researchers and research projects for funding support, contributing to policy reports, and speaking at the Academy’s public events.”

Garland, Arthur T. Vanderbilt Professor of Law at NYU’s School of Law and a professor in NYU’s Department of Sociology, is widely considered one of the world’s leading sociologists of crime and punishment. He has played a leading role in developing the sociology of punishment and was the founding editor of the interdisciplinary journal Punishment & Society. He is the author of a series of prize-winning studies, including: Punishment and Modern Society: A Study in Social Theory, which won distinguished book awards from the American Sociological Association and the Society for the Study of Social Problems; Punishment and Welfare: The History of Penal Strategies, which won the International Society of Criminology’s prize for best study over a five-year period; The Culture of Control: Crime and Social Order in Contemporary Society, which is one of the most influential studies in contemporary criminology; and Peculiar Institution: America’s Death Penalty in an Age of Abolition, which won awards from the American Sociological Association, the Association of American Publishers, and the American Society of Criminology.

Young, Julius Silver Professor of English and Comparative Literature at NYU, is a recognized expert in a range of interdisciplinary cultural fields, notably: postcolonial literatures and theory; the history of colonialism and anti-colonialism; and cultural history of the 19th and 20th centuries. His published works include: The Idea of English Ethnicity; Postcolonialism: A Very Short Introduction; Postcolonialism: A Historical Introduction; Torn Halves: Political Conflict in Literary and Cultural Theory; Colonial Desire: Hybridity in Culture, Theory and Race; and White Mythologies: Writing History and the West. He is editor of the quarterly Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies, which he co-founded in 1998. His work has been translated into over 20 languages.

For more information on the British Academy for the humanities and the social science, please visit www.britac.ac.uk.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
Arts and Science, Research, NYUToday-feature, School of Law

Type: Press Release

Press Contact: James Devitt | (212) 998-6808

NYU Professors Garland and Young Elected British Academy Fellows

NYU professors David Garland and Robert Young have been elected to the British Academy as Corresponding Fellows “for their outstanding research and work across the humanities and social sciences,” the Academy said in its announcement.


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