New York University Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Navigation Skip to Sub Navigation

“Love and Let Lie”—A Symposium on Longevity, Quality of Life & Generational Conflict, June 1

May 17, 2013
332

New York University will host “Love and Let Lie”—an all-day symposium on longevity, quality of life, and the brewing inter-generational conflict—on Saturday, June 1, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. at NYU’s Cantor Film Center (36 East 8th Street/between University Place and Greene Street).

The event, co-sponsored by the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU and the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU, is free and open to the public. Call 212.998.2101 for more information. Admission is on a first-come, first-served basis. Subways: A, C, E, D, F (West 4th Street); 6 (Astor Place); N, R (8th Street).

With increasing frequency these days, one hears stories of 60-year-olds having to cope with the excruciating medically extended lives of their ever-more-incapacitated 90 year-old parents. But look at the situation from the point of view of their 25-year-old children, trying to imagine what the world will be like when those same baby-boom parents reach 90. We may well be approaching a situation in which we as a society will have to choose between living in a world where an 85-year-old can routinely be granted five hip operations, or one in which we can still afford, say, primary school. Why do we have such a hard time talking about such things and how might we begin to change that?

Speakers include: Arthur Caplan, director of NYU Langone Medical Center’s Division of Medical Ethics; monologist Mike Daisey; Sandy Macrae, chief medical officer at GlaxoSmithKline; Elizabeth Capezuti, Dr. John W. Rowe Professor in Successful Aging at NYU’s College of Nursing; Jad Abumrad, host of WNYC’s Radiolab; and Lawrence Weschler, director of the New York Institute for the Humanities. For a complete schedule of sessions, click here.

Reporters wishing to attend should contact Stephanie Steiker at the New York Institute for the Humanities: 212.998.2101 or stephanie.steiker@nyu.edu.

Editor’s Note:
The New York Institute for the Humanities (NYIH) at NYU was established in 1976 to promote the exchange of ideas between academics, professionals, politicians, diplomats, writers, journalists, musicians, painters, and other artists in New York City—and between all of them and the city. It currently comprises 220 fellows. Throughout the year, the NYIH organizes numerous free public programs, including conferences, symposia, readings, and performances. For further information, visit nyihumanities.org or contact nyih.info@nyu.edu or 212.998.2101.

The Institute for Public Knowledge (IPK) brings theoretically serious scholarship to bear on major public issues. Located at NYU, it nurtures collaboration among social researchers in New York and around the world. It builds bridges between university-based researchers and organizations pursuing practical action. It supports communication between researchers and broader publics. And it examines transformations in the public sphere, social science, and the university as a social institution as these change the conditions for public knowledge. For more, go to http://ipk.nyu.edu/.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
College of Nursing, Arts and Science, Research

Type: Press Release

Press Contact: James Devitt | (212) 998-6808

“Love and Let Lie”—A Symposium on Longevity, Quality of Life & Generational Conflict, June 1

NYU will host “Love and Let Lie”—an all-day symposium on longevity, quality of life, and the brewing inter-generational conflict—on Saturday, June 1, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. at the Cantor Film Center.


Search News



NYU In the News

Paying It Backward: NYU Alum Funds Scholarships

The Wall Street Journal profiled Trustee Evan Chesler on why he decided to chair the Momentum fund-raising campaign.

A Nobel Prize Party: Cheese, Bubbles, and a Boson

The New Yorker talked to Professor Kyle Cranmer and graduate student Sven Kreiss about NYU’s role in the discovery of the Higgs boson, which resulted in a Nobel prize for the scientists who predicted its existence.

The World as They Knew It

The New York Times reviewed the exhibit at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World on how ancient Greeks and Romans mapped the known and unknown areas of their world.

Elite Institutions: Far More Diverse Than They Were 20 Years Ago

NYU made stronger gains over the last 20 years in increasing diversity than any other major research university, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Program Seeks to Nurture ‘Data Science Culture’
at Universities

The New York Times reported on the multi-million collaboration among NYU and two other universities to harness the potential of Big Data, including an interview with Professor Yann LeCun, director of NYU’s Center for Data Science.

NYU Footer