New York University Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Navigation Skip to Sub Navigation

NYU to Host Bahrain Dissident al-Khawaja as Part of Roundtable Discussion, May 7

April 11, 2013
267

New York University will host Maryam al-Khawaja, part of a human rights activist family in Bahrain, for a roundtable discussion—“What the Hell is Going on in Bahrain? And to What Extent is the United States Implicated?”—on Tuesday, May 7, 6:30 p.m. at NYU’s School of Law (Tishman Auditorium, Vanderbilt Hall, 40 Washington Square South [between Washington Square West and Sullivan Street]).

Other panelists include: Aryeh Neier, president emeritus of the Open Society Foundations; Ruth Wedgwood, a professor of international law and diplomacy at Johns Hopkins’ Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies and a former member of the United Nations Human Rights Committee; and Sarah Leah Whitson, director of the Middle East and North Africa division of Human Rights Watch.

The event, co-sponsored by the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU and the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice (CHRGJ) at NYU’s School of Law, is free and open to the public. Call 212.998.2101 for more information. Admission is on a first-come, first-served basis. Subways: A, B, C, D, E, F, M (West 4th Street)

Reporters wishing to attend should contact Stephanie Steiker at the New York Institute for the Humanities: 212.998.2101 or stephanie.steiker@nyu.edu.

Maryam al-Khawaja is part of a family that has sought to bring democracy to the autocratic monarchy of Bahrain. Both her father, Abdulhadi, and her sister, Zainab, regularly launch extended hunger strikes, protesting conditions of their incarceration. All three have been nominated for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize.

Editor’s Note:
The New York Institute for the Humanities (NYIH) at NYU was established in 1976 to promote the exchange of ideas between academics, professionals, politicians, diplomats, writers, journalists, musicians, painters, and other artists in New York City—and between all of them and the city. It currently comprises 220 fellows. Throughout the year, the NYIH organizes numerous free public programs, including conferences, symposia, readings, and performances. For further information, visit nyihumanities.org or contact nyih.info@nyu.edu or 212.998.2101.

The Center for Human Rights and Global Justice (CHRGJ) was established in 2002 to bring together and expand the rich array of teaching, research, clinical, internship, and publishing activities undertaken at NYU School of Law. Today the Center is the hub of human rights study at the law school—the top-ranked program for international law in the country and one of the premier law schools in the world. Having built a reputation for its academic and clinical work on a broad array of human rights subjects—including counter-terrorism; corporate abuses; caste discrimination; gender-based violence; economic, social, and cultural rights; and extrajudicial executions—CHRGJ’s work is currently being guided by its 2012-14 Initiative on “Human Rights Fact-finding, Methods, and Evidence.” To learn more about its work and mandate, please see: www.chrgj.org.


This Press Release is in the following Topics:
Arts and Science, Around the Square

Type: Press Release

Press Contact: James Devitt | (212) 998-6808

NYU to Host Bahrain Dissident al-Khawaja as Part of Roundtable Discussion, May 7

New York University will host Maryam al-Khawaja, above, part of a human rights activist family in Bahrain, for a roundtable discussion—“What the Hell is Going on in Bahrain? And to What Extent is the United States Implicated?”—on Tuesday, May 7, 6:30 p.m. at NYU’s School of Law.


Search News



NYU In the News

Paying It Backward: NYU Alum Funds Scholarships

The Wall Street Journal profiled Trustee Evan Chesler on why he decided to chair the Momentum fund-raising campaign.

A Nobel Prize Party: Cheese, Bubbles, and a Boson

The New Yorker talked to Professor Kyle Cranmer and graduate student Sven Kreiss about NYU’s role in the discovery of the Higgs boson, which resulted in a Nobel prize for the scientists who predicted its existence.

The World as They Knew It

The New York Times reviewed the exhibit at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World on how ancient Greeks and Romans mapped the known and unknown areas of their world.

Elite Institutions: Far More Diverse Than They Were 20 Years Ago

NYU made stronger gains over the last 20 years in increasing diversity than any other major research university, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Program Seeks to Nurture ‘Data Science Culture’
at Universities

The New York Times reported on the multi-million collaboration among NYU and two other universities to harness the potential of Big Data, including an interview with Professor Yann LeCun, director of NYU’s Center for Data Science.

NYU Footer