New York University Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Navigation Skip to Sub Navigation

NYU Physicists Part of Team Behind New Finding Supporting Discovery of the Higgs Boson

March 14, 2013
225

New York University physicists are part of the research team behind a new finding offering additional evidence supporting the discovery of the Higgs boson.

In 2012, physicists based at the CERN laboratory near Geneva announced the discovery of a new particle that was believed to be the Higgs boson, a sub-atomic particle that plays a key role in our understanding of the universe.

Today, CERN announced, after analyzing two and a half times more data than was available for last year’s announcement, that the previously discovered particle is “looking more and more like a Higgs boson.”

The NYU Experimental High Energy Physics group has been a key part of a world-wide collaboration in the search for the Higgs boson, and Kyle Cranmer, an assistant professor in NYU’s Department of Physics, has several leadership roles in this endeavor.

Cranmer, along with graduate student Sven Kreiss and research assistants Attila Krasznahorkay, Rost Konoplich, and Kirill Prokofiev, were part of a team that conducted the updated analysis.

“All of the fundamental particles we know of are spinning like little tops,” Cranmer said. “The Higgs boson would be the first fundamental particle with no spin, and that is what we have confirmed. In parallel, we are making other precise measurements to see if it is the Higgs boson predicted by a theory called the Standard Model.”

“I think the important milestone is that we now consider this new particle to be a Higgs boson, while before we were always very cautious and called it a ‘Higgs-like boson’,” he added. “The new results both show what we expected—that last year’s discovery is some form of Higgs boson—and give us some optimism that we might unveil new physics through precise measurements.”

The Higgs boson is named after physicist Peter Higgs, who theorized its existence more than 40 years ago as a way to explain why fundamental particles like the electron have mass. It has been dubbed the “God Particle” because of its important role in shaping the universe.

“If there was no Higgs, atoms wouldn’t form -- there would be no life,” Cranmer explained.

For more on NYU’s involvement, click here.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
NYUToday-feature, Arts and Science, Research

Type: Press Release

Press Contact: James Devitt | (212) 998-6808

NYU Physicists Part of Team Behind New Finding Supporting Discovery of the Higgs Boson

NYU physicists are part of the research team behind a new finding offering additional evidence supporting the discovery of the Higgs boson. In 2012, physicists based at the CERN laboratory near Geneva announced the discovery of a new particle that was believed to be the Higgs boson, a sub-atomic particle that plays a key role in our understanding of the universe. Today, CERN announced, after analyzing two and a half times more data than was available for last year’s announcement, that the previously discovered particle is “looking more and more like a Higgs boson.” ©CERN


Search News



NYU In the News

Paying It Backward: NYU Alum Funds Scholarships

The Wall Street Journal profiled Trustee Evan Chesler on why he decided to chair the Momentum fund-raising campaign.

A Nobel Prize Party: Cheese, Bubbles, and a Boson

The New Yorker talked to Professor Kyle Cranmer and graduate student Sven Kreiss about NYU’s role in the discovery of the Higgs boson, which resulted in a Nobel prize for the scientists who predicted its existence.

The World as They Knew It

The New York Times reviewed the exhibit at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World on how ancient Greeks and Romans mapped the known and unknown areas of their world.

Elite Institutions: Far More Diverse Than They Were 20 Years Ago

NYU made stronger gains over the last 20 years in increasing diversity than any other major research university, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Program Seeks to Nurture ‘Data Science Culture’
at Universities

The New York Times reported on the multi-million collaboration among NYU and two other universities to harness the potential of Big Data, including an interview with Professor Yann LeCun, director of NYU’s Center for Data Science.

NYU Footer