Husband and Wife Research Team at NYU Receives Grant to Study Speech in Parkinson’s Sufferers


More than three decades ago, neurosurgeons first investigated the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) to relieve severe body tremors in patients battling the neurological disorder Parkinson’s disease.

In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration officially approved DBS for tremors. Fifteen years later, its effects are still not completely understood.

For Diana Sidtis, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development professor of communicative sciences and disorders, and her husband, John J. Sidtis, research professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the NYU School of Medicine, the mystery of how DBS affects the “low, soft, and breathy” speech of those living with the illness remains a driving force behind their research. Thanks to a $2.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, they can continue their search for answers.

“Parkinson’s patients have movement disorders, tremors, or slowness of movement that result in speech problems,” Diana Sidtis explains. “Through previous studies, we found that Parkinson’s disease is characterized by grea 500

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