French Writer Michel Butor to Discuss Craft, Place and Language —March 8 at the Gallatin School


Author Michel Butor, best known as a leading proponent of “Le Nouveau Roman,” a post-World War II French literary movement that departed from classical genres, will make a rare New York appearance on Thurs., March 8, 7 p.m. at NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study.

French Writer Michel Butor to Discuss Discuss Craft, Place and Language —March 8 at the Gallatin School
Author Michel Butor, above, best known as a leading proponent of “Le Nouveau Roman,” a post-World War II French literary movement that departed from classical genres, will make a rare New York appearance on Thurs., March 8, 7 p.m. at New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study. Photo courtesy of Hélène Tobler.

Author Michel Butor, best known as a leading proponent of “Le Nouveau Roman,” a post-World War II French literary movement that departed from classical genres, will make a rare New York appearance on Thurs., March 8, 7 p.m. at New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study (1 Washington Place [at Broadway]).

Butor has authored Passage de Milan (1954), L'emploi du temps [Passing Time] (1956), La modification [Second Thoughts] (1957), and Degrés (1960), among other works. Butor’s novels, poems, and essays demonstrate how a place can influence and inform a way of thinking. He will discuss his work with Professor Lois Oppenheim, who chairs Montclair State University’s Department of Modern Languages and Literatures.

The event is free and open to the public. To RSVP (required), email nyc.events@eda.admin.ch. For more information, call 212.599.5700, x. 1061. Subways: N, R (8th Street); 6 (Bleecker Street). Reporters wishing to attend must RSVP to James Devitt, NYU’s Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu.

The event will also include a sneak preview of the 2012 traveling exhibition on Albert Gallatin, organized by the Bibliothèque de Genève and running at NYU’s Elmer Holmes Bobst Library from November 2012 to March 2013. Gallatin, after whom NYU’s Gallatin School is named, emigrated from Geneva in the 1780s, served as Thomas Jefferson’s Treasury Secretary, and was a co-founder of NYU.

The evening is part of the week-long “ThinkSwiss: Genève Meets New York” (March 6-12). On the occasion of the 300th anniversary of the birth of Geneva’s Jean-Jacques Rousseau, the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York and the City of Geneva will present more than 10 events at venues throughout Manhattan, highlighting ideas born in Geneva that continue to reverberate far beyond its borders. Venues include the New York Public Library, NYU, Cooper Union, the American Red Cross, the Kitchen and Merkin Hall, among others. For more, go to http://www.thinkswissny.org.

 

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