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Carter Journalism Institute Accepting Applications for “The Reporting Award” to Cover Underreported Topics in the Public Interest

December 19, 2012
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New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute is accepting applications for “The Reporting Award,” which supports a work of journalism in any medium on significant underreported subjects of public interest.

The Carter Institute initiated the award in 2009 to encourage enterprising journalism at a time when staff and budget cuts have diminished the capacity of the media to support such projects.

A committee of Carter Institute faculty will select one recipient based on an application due February 19, 2013. The recipient will be announced in March 2013, with the project completion deadline set for November 1, 2013. Details and the online application form are available here. For more information, email thereportingaward@nyu.edu or call 212.998.7887.

The award includes a stipend of $2,500 upon selection as the competition winner and an additional $10,000 upon timely completion and submission of the work, provided the Institute’s awards committee judges the work acceptable. The winner will also have use of the Institute’s facilities as well as NYU’s libraries and other scholarly resources. In addition, the program will fund up to $6,000 of NYU journalism graduate student assistance. The Institute will publish the completed work either alone or in partnership with another media outlet.

The inaugural recipient of the award was Sarah Stillman, a freelance journalist who traveled to Iraq and Afghanistan to investigate the difficulties experienced by many civilian workers on U.S. military bases. Stillman’s piece, “The Invisible Army,” appeared in the June 6, 2011 issue of the New Yorker. It won the National Magazine Award in the category of “Public Interest” and the Overseas Press Club’s Joe and Laurie Dine Award for International Human Rights Reporting, among other honors. The second recipient, Jina Moore, is investigating so-called “vulture funds,” distressed debt investors who purchase delinquent debt of sovereign nations, many of them poor. The third recipient, Lisa Armstrong, an award-winning reporter who has written for the Washington Post, National Geographic, and O, the Oprah Magazine, is working on a story on sexual violence in Haiti, which has increased threefold since the January 2010 earthquake.

For more on the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, click here.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
NYUToday-feature, Arts and Science, Around the Square

Type: Press Release

Press Contact: James Devitt | (212) 998-6808

Carter Journalism Institute Accepting Applications for “The Reporting Award”

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