New York University Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Navigation Skip to Sub Navigation

NYU Conference Will Focus on New State and Federal Laws Set to Change Primary and Behavioral Health Care System in New York

December 3, 2012

A mix of policy makers, practitioners, and experts in health care will gather at New York University on Wednesday, December 5, to explore the ramifications of major state and federal laws that have changed the primary and behavioral healthcare system on which millions of New Yorkers rely.

The all-day conference co-sponsored by the NYU Silver School of Social Work’s Office of Global and Lifelong Learning and the McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research at NYU Silver will begin at 9:00 a.m. at the Kimmel Center for University Life, Rosenthal Pavilion, 60 Washington Square South, New York, N.Y.

Media coverage is invited.

The event is called “Preparing for a Changing a Primary and Behavioral Healthcare System: Cultivating Knowledge and Skills to Meet the Challenge.” Other sponsors include the Clinic Technical Assistance Center (CTAC), the New York State Office of Mental Health (NYS OMH), the Institute for Community Living (ICL), and New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH).

Publicly funded mental health, substance use, and primary care providers assist those made vulnerable by social, economic, physical, and psychological health challenges. The New York State Medicaid Redesign Commission and the U.S. Affordable Care Act have emphasized the need to integrate care across systems with the dual goal of increasing the quality of care and controlling costs. Organizations across New York State are working to grapple with these changes while providing the highest quality care.

Presenters will discuss challenges and opportunities associated with: creating an integrated system of care that has implications for workforce development; the engagement and involvement of peers and family members; the use of information and data to promote quality and business efficiencies; the adoption of evidence-based practices, and the changing roles of primary and behavioral healthcare providers. The event is supported by FEGS Health and Human Service System Services for the Underserved; Jewish Board of Family and Children's Services (JBFCS); and Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

For more information please contact conference coordinator Stephanie Kaplan at 212.998.5897 or stephanie.kaplan@nyu.edu.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
Silver School of Social Work, NYUToday-feature

Type: Press Release

Press Contact: Robert Polner | (212) 998-2337

NYU Conference Will Focus on New State and Federal Laws Set to Change Primary and Behavioral Health Care System in New York

Search News



NYU In the News

NYU Offers Financial Aid to Undocumented Students

The Wall Street Journal reported that NYU will begin offering scholarship aid to undocumented students for the school year beginning next September.

NYU Adopts Lean LaunchPad Program to Teach Entrepreneurship

Startup guru Steve Blank, in a Huffington Post blog, described how NYU adopted the Lean LaunchPad model to teach entrepreneurship to students and faculty at NYU.

Biology Professor Jane Carlton Examines Wastewater for the City’s Microbiome

The New York Times’ Science Times column “Well” profiled Biology Professor Jane Carlton and her research project to sequence microbiome of New York City by examining wastewater samples.

Steinhardt Professors Use a Play as Therapy

The New York Times wrote about a play written by Steinhardt Music Professor Robert Landy about the relationship between Adjunct Professor Cecilia Dintino, a clinical psychologist in the Drama Therapy Program, and a patient, former Broadway actress Jill Powell.

NYU Public Health Experts Urge Strengthening Local Health Systems to Combat Ebola

Dean Cheryl Healton of the Global Institute of Public Health and Public Health Professor Christopher Dickey wrote an op-ed in the Huffington Post saying international health agencies need to strengthen their presence in countries at the local level to prevent future ebola outbreaks.

NYU Footer