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Scott Hightower’s Self-Evident Stretches from the Enlightenment to the Spanish Civil War—in Verse

March 13, 2012
281

Self-Evident, the latest book of verses by award-winning poet Scott Hightower, commences with the Enlightenment, before moving to the Spanish Civil War, then concluding with works best described as self-portraiture.

Self-Evident, to be released by Barrow Street Press in April, moves through the centuries while invoking a range of real-life and fictional figures—Benjamin Franklin, Stanley Kowalski the Nobel prize-winning scientist Severo Ochoa, Spanish poet Aurora de Albornoz, and even Peter Pan, to name a few. Though Hightower’s poems employ history as a vehicle, he aims to use the past to shed light on our contemporary inner selves.

Hightower, who teaches in NYU’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, is the author of three previous books of poetry: Tin Can Tourist, Natural Trouble, and Part of the Bargain, which received Copper Canyon Press’s Hayden Carruth Award. Hightower’s poems have appeared in the Yale Review, Salmagundi, Ploughshares, and the Paris Review, among other publications. For more, go to: scotthightower.com.

For review copies, contact Alyson D’Amato at alyson_damato@my.uri.edu.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
Gallatin School of Individualized Study, Faculty Book

Type: Press Release

Press Contact: James Devitt | (212) 998-6808

Scott Hightower’s Self-Evident Stretches from the Enlightenment to the Spanish Civil War—in Verse

Self-Evident, the latest book of verses by Gallatin's Scott Hightower, commences with the Enlightenment, before moving to the Spanish Civil War, then concluding with works best described as self-portraiture.


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