Dinosaur Expert Horner to Deliver Public Lecture in Celebration of Darwin’s Birthday—Feb. 9 at NYU


Jack Horner, who discovered the first dinosaur eggs in the Western Hemisphere, will deliver “Dinosaurs: Getting Rid of Some Old Ones, and Making Some New Ones,” a public lecture celebrating the birthday of Charles Darwin, on February 9 at NYU's Center for Genomics & Systems Biology (CGSB) Auditorium.

Dinosaur Expert Horner to Deliver Public Lecture in Celebration of Darwin’s Birthday—Feb. 9 at NYU
Jack Horner, who discovered the first dinosaur eggs in the Western Hemisphere, will deliver “Dinosaurs: Getting Rid of Some Old Ones, and Making Some New Ones,” a public lecture celebrating the birthday of Charles Darwin, on February 9 at New York University’s Center for Genomics & Systems Biology.

Jack Horner, who discovered the first dinosaur eggs in the Western Hemisphere, will deliver “Dinosaurs: Getting Rid of Some Old Ones, and Making Some New Ones,” a public lecture celebrating the birthday of Charles Darwin, on Wednesday, February 9, 3:45 p.m. at New York University’s Center for Genomics & Systems Biology (CGSB) Auditorium, 12 Waverly Place (between Greene and Mercer Streets).

The lecture, hosted by NYU’s Department of Biology and in cooperation with the university’s Dean for Science, is free and open to the public. For more information, call 212.998.8209. Reporters interested in attending must RSVP to James Devitt, NYU’s Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu.

Horner, whose discovery marked the first evidence of parental care among dinosaurs, is the curator of paleontology at the Museum of the Rockies and a professor of paleontology at Montana State University. The dinosaur Anasazisaurus horneri is named after him. Awarded an honorary Doctorate of Science from the University of Montana, this MacArthur fellowship recipient served as a technical advisor for Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park movies.

EDITOR’S NOTE:

Faculty at NYU’s Center for Genomics and Systems Biology are combining genomic and systems biology approaches to understand how changes in genomes give rise to the diversity of regulatory networks in microbes, animals, and plants. For more, click here.

 

Press Contact

James Devitt
James Devitt
(212) 998-6808