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Anti-Trafficking Humanitarian Somaly Mam to Speak at NYU on Oct. 21

October 7, 2011

Somaly Mam, a former sex trafficked victim from Cambodia and now world-renowned humanitarian, will speak on October 21 in the Kimmel Center's Rosenthal Pavilion.

The event starts at 8:00 pm, and doors open at 7:45 pm.

A best-selling author, Mam was named one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People of 2009, and was featured as a CNN Hero.


This event is open to the public, but seating is limited, so get your ticket soon.

The event is FREE for NYU Students (available with valid student ID at the Ticket Central box office)
• $10 for non-NYU Guests in advance (available online)
• $12 for non-NYU Guests Day-of-Event

NYU tickets are available at the Ticket Central box office (next to Skirball Auditorium).

Read more about Somaly Mam.





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Anti-Trafficking Humanitarian Solmaly Mam to Speak at NYU on Oct. 21

Somaly Mam


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