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NYU’s 2011 Stahl Lecture Series, “Begetting Rabbinic Judaism,” Considers Biblical Influences on Western Culture, April 7, 12, and 14

March 3, 2011
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New York University’s Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies will host the Benita and Sigmund Stahl Lecture Program in Jewish Studies, “Begetting Rabbinic Judaism: Moments of Religious Transformation in Second Temple Judaism,” April 7, 12, and 14, at NYU’s Languages and Literature Building, 19 University Place (at 8th Street).

The lecture series is free and open to the public and an RSVP is required. Call 212.998.8980 or email fas.hjst.events@nyu.edu and include name, the lecture(s) you wish to attend.  Reporters interested in attending any of the lectures must RSVP to James Devitt, NYU’s Office of Public Affairs, at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu. Subway Lines:  A, B, C, D, E, F, M (West 4th Street); N, R (8th Street); 6 (Astor Place).

This year’s lectures will be delivered by Gary Anderson, the Hesburgh Professor of Catholic Theology at the University of Notre Dame, whose work explores how Biblical ideas have shaped the evolution of Western culture. He is the author of The Genesis of Perfection: Adam and Eve in Jewish and Christian Imagination and Sin: A History. His forthcoming book will focus on the development of the concept of charity in early Jewish religion and how those concepts influenced Christianity and Islam.  

“The Binding of Isaac”

Thursday, April 7, 6 p.m.

No Biblical text has been more widely commented upon than this. It is part of the daily liturgy in the Jewish prayer and the subject of more artistic representations than almost any other text. Yet at the same time the text has become terribly controversial in the modern period.  This lecture will examine some of the radical ways in which this story was read and reread.

“The Resurrection of the Dead”

Tuesday, April 12, 6 p.m.

This is one of the most important doctrines of early Rabbinic Judaism.  The Mishnah declared it a fundamental tenet of the Jewish faith and it became the foundation stone of the Christian movement. Yet the idea can only be found once or twice in the Hebrew Bible, and only then in very late contexts. This lecture will address what the resurrection from the dead means in the Hebrew Bible and how was it understood in the Second Temple Period.

“Jesus the Jew”

Thursday, April 14, 6 p.m.

Modern historical research has uncovered a treasure trove of new data that casts new light on the Jewishness of Jesus. This lecture will consider what that Jewish data is and how similar some of the teachings of Jesus are to the contemporary Judaism of his day.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
Arts and Science, Around the Square, Events, Events and Traditions

Type: Press Release

Press Contact: James Devitt | (212) 998-6808

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