NYU's Metro Center Hosts Symposium on Single-Sex Schools for Black and Latino Boys


At a symposium on Thursday, April 29, researchers from NYU’s Metropolitan Center for Urban Education will release findings from a three-year national study of single-sex schools, Is All Male Alright?: An Intervention Study of Schools for Black and Latino Males.

There is growing awareness about the crisis confronting many of our nation’s boys. The high school graduation rate for young men of color is alarming: just 39 percent for African Americans and 38 percent for Latinos. New York is among the states with the highest drop-out rates in the country.  Educators find themselves at the center of the debate over the most effective ways to reduce and prevent some of the hardships and problems associated with the most vulnerable males.  

Led by NYU faculty member Pedro Noguera and the George Jackson Academy (GJA), the only private upper elementary and middle school in the study, the symposium will provide an opportunity for educators to learn about the study’s preliminary findings and discuss its policy implications. The symposium will take place at Rosenthal Pavilion, NYU’s Kimmel Center, 60 Washington Square South (between Thompson and LaGuardia Place) from 8:30 a.m to noon.

The symposium will feature a panel discussion and Q & A on replicable models of curriculum and community at GJA and other all-male schools in the study, followed by the keynote by Noguera.

Included among the findings:

  • The most successful single-sex schools established a sense of “brotherhood” among their students, which instills the resilience necessary to developing and sustaining their emerging academic identities.
  • Feelings of safety were strongly correlated with higher levels of academic achievement.
  • Culturally relevant, academically rigorous instruction was most effective in raising achievement, helping students to see the connection between the curriculum and their lives.
  • The interventions shared by the single-sex schools include: building school engagement through extracurricular activities, using advisories to foster strong teacher-student relationships, a strong emphasis on college preparation during middle school, and community service.
  • At the most successful schools teachers received ongoing professional development on the academic and social needs of this particular population of students.
  • The principals of the single-sex schools all stressed the importance of community leadership, parental involvement and nurturing strong relationships with students to promote achievement.

Reporters interested in learning more about George Jackson Academy may contact Susan Siegel, director of development, at ssiegel@gjacademy.com or by phone at 212.228.6789. For inquiries regarding the Metro Center and its study, 500

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