Over-Reliance on Private Security by Military Forces Harming Stabilization Efforts in Afghanistan, Report by NYU’s Center on International Cooperation Finds


The Public Cost of Private Security in Afghanistan, authored by New York University s Center on International Cooperation, analyzes the negative impact of weak private security oversight in Afghanistan. The report concludes that over-reliance on private security - above all, on local militia groups - by international military forces is harming stabilization efforts.

Michele Shapiro | 212.998.3688 or 917-658-6760 | michele.cic@nyu.edu

The Public Cost of Private Security in Afghanistan, authored by New York University’s Center on International Cooperation, analyzes the negative impact of weak private security oversight in Afghanistan. The report concludes that over-reliance on private security - above all, on local militia groups - by international military forces is harming stabilization efforts. Among the report’s findings are the following:

  • Contracted security increased the cost of highway reconstruction projects by up to 15 percent;
  • The number of US Dept. of Defense security contractors increased 19 percent (to 5,198 personnel) from March to August 2009;
  • More than 1,000 local militia groups have been employed, trained, and armed by international military forces since 2001; and
  • Ten to 20 percent of reconstruction funding is spent on private security.

The report provides essential background on the use of private security by the US government and NATO forces in Afghanistan, and on the regulatory framework governing private security, as public evidence of gross negligence at the US Embas 500

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