NYU Researchers Question Effectiveness of Surveillance Cameras in Reducing Crime

Despite the increased use of electronic surveillance devices, including closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras, in public and privately owned housing complexes in New York City, there is little evidence that such sophisticated electronic monitoring reduces the incidence of crime, according to an impact analysis by researchers at New York University.

However, the study’s authors caution that that further research is warranted before a definitive evaluation of the efficacy of electronic monitoring in reducing crime can be made.

Analyzing crime data from Manhattan’s Peter Cooper Village and Stuyvesant Town for a period of five years, from January 1, 2002 through December 2006, David F. Greenberg, professor of sociology, and Jeffrey B. Roush, an operations management consultant for EMA Inc., examined the degree to which incidences of crime dropped in the two housing complexes following the introduction of an integrated security management system at the end of 2004. The system included the installation of CCTV, 500

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