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NYU’S Glucksman Ireland House Hosts Special Events in September

September 2, 2009
N-4, 2009-10

Glucksman Ireland House at New York University, located at One Washington Mews (at Fifth Avenue), will host several special events in September, including a September 14 reading and discussion by Donal O’Kelley of his acclaimed play, The Cambria, which opens at the Irish Arts Center on September 16. All events take place at Ireland House, unless otherwise noted. Admission is free to members of Ireland House and those with an NYU ID; for all others, $10 admission to regular events and $15 for Blarney Star Concert Series events. To reserve a seat, call 212.998.3950 or email ireland.house@nyu.edu.

A schedule of events follows:

Thurs., Sept. 10, 7 p.m.

Panel discussion: “The Journey of Irish Women in New York Theater.” Irish women working in contemporary NY theater share thoughts, views, and opinions. Presented in association with Origin Theatre Company as part of the 1st Irish theater festival 2009.

Mon., Sept. 14, 7 p.m.

Reading and discussion: Playwright and actor Donal O’Kelly speaks on and performs excerpts from his acclaimed play, The Cambria, the story of Frederick Douglass’s 1845 visit to Ireland. The play opens at the Irish Arts Center on Sept. 16.

Thurs., Sept. 17, 7 p.m.

Lecture: Christopher Morash, NUI Maynooth, discusses the place of Lennox Robinson’s plays of the 1920s within European modernism, suggesting that the Irish Free State was less insular than believed. Presented in association with the Mint Theater as part of the 1st Irish theater festival 2009.

Fri., Sept. 18, 9 p.m.

The Blarney Star Concert Series: Renowned musicians and singers Mattie and Dierdre Connolly perform on the uilleann pipes and flute to celebrate the release of their father-and-daughter recording.

Wed., Sept. 23, 7 p.m.

Lecture: “Literature and Social Change in Ireland” by Patricia Coughian of University College Cork. Presented in collaboration with the University of Notre Dame.

Fri., Sept. 25, 7 p.m.

Screening: Butte, America. Narrated by 2009 Golden Globe-winner Gabriel Byrne, this documentary records the sometimes glorious, sometimes sorrowful, story of the most lucrative hard rock mining town in American history. It is also the story of a specific Irish immigrant experience. Presented in association with the Irish Arts Center. Note venue: NYU Cantor Film Center, 36 E. 8th St.

Tues., Sept. 29, 7 p.m.

Lecture: “Modernism and Revolution: Re-reading Yeats’s ‘Easter 1916’” by Terence Brown, Trinity College Dublin. Presented in cooperation with the W.B. Yeats Society of New York.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
Events and Traditions

Type: Press Release


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