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"Dead Aid," with African Aid Experts Dambisa Moyo and William Easterly, at NYU, March 26

March 5, 2009
N-326, 2008-09

New York University’s Development Research Institute will host a Templeton Book Forum, “Dead Aid,” with African aid experts Dambisa Moyo and NYU Economics Professor William Easterly on Thursday, March 26, 7-8:30 p.m. at NYU’s School of Law, Furman Hall, Room 216, 245 Sullivan Street (at West 3rd Street). Subway Lines: A, B, C, D, E, F, V (West 4th Street). Please RSVP to bookforum@templeton.org. For more information, call 610.941.4050.

Reporters interested in attending the event should contact James Devitt of NYU’s Office of Public Affairs at 212.998.6808 or james.devitt@nyu.edu.

Moyo, author of Dead Aid: Why Aid Is Not Working and How There Is a Better Way for Africa, is the former head of economic research and strategy for sub-Saharan Africa at Goldman Sachs. Born and raised in Lusaka, Zambia, Moyo previously worked at the World Bank in Washington D.C. and was a co-author of its annual World Development Report.

Easterly is a professor of economics and co-director of the Development Research Institute at New York University. He is co-editor of the Journal of Development Economics and the author of The White Man’s Burden: How the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good and The Elusive Quest for Growth: Economists’ Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics.


EDITOR’S NOTE
The John Templeton Foundation serves as a philanthropic catalyst for research on what scientists and philosophers call the Big Questions. It supports work at the world’s top universities in such fields as theoretical physics, cosmology, evolutionary biology, cognitive science, and social science relating to love, forgiveness, creativity, purpose, and the nature and origin of religious belief. It encourages informed, open-minded dialogue between scientists and theologians as they apply themselves to the most profound issues in their particular disciplines. And it seeks to stimulate new thinking about wealth creation in the developing world, character education in schools and universities, and programs for cultivating the talents of gifted children.

The Development Research Institute (DRI) is devoted to rigorous, scholarly research on the economic development and growth of poor countries. An independent and non-partisan organization, DRI builds upon a foundation of academic research comparing aid agency practices and surveying the thinking behind aid projects. For more, go to http://www.nyu.edu/fas/institute/dri/.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
Graduate School of Arts and Science, Events and Traditions

Type: Press Release


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