New York University Skip to Content Skip to Search Skip to Navigation Skip to Sub Navigation

NYU's Richard Sennett Wins Germany's Tessenow Medal for Work On Urban Culture and Public Space

January 15, 2009
N-227, 2008-09

New York University Professor Richard Sennett has been named the winner of the 2009 Heinrich Tessenow Medal for his work in the areas of urban culture and public space. Since its inception in 1963, the medal had been awarded exclusively to architects and designers. Sennett, a sociologist, is the author of several works, including The Craftsman (2008), which explores artisans across different historical periods.

Established by Hamburg’s Alfred Toepfer Foundation, the prize honors Heinrich Tessenow (1876-1950), a German architect, professor, and urban planner during the Weimar period. The medal was created “to honor people who have achieved distinction in craft and industrial form-making and in the teaching of the culture of living and building, and who have through their life’s work acted in the spirit of Heinrich Tessenow.” The Heinrich Tessenow Society will award Sennett the medal at a February 26 ceremony in Berlin.

A renowned social critic, Sennett is the author of: The Culture of the New Capitalism (2006); Respect in a World of Inequality (2003); The Corrosion of Character: The Personal Consequences of Work in the New Capitalism (1998); Flesh and Stone: The Body and the City in Western Civilization (1994); The Conscience of the Eye: The Design and Social Life of Cities (1990); Authority (1980); and The Fall of Public Man (1977).

Sennett, also a professor of sociology at the London School of Economics, holds the rank of University Professor at NYU. The title is conferred upon outstanding scholars in recognition of the interdisciplinary dimension of their work.

Sennett is the founding director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU, which was established in 1976, and is a member of numerous international associations and scientific academies, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Society of Literature, and the Royal Society of the Arts. In 1998, he was awarded the European Amalfi Prize for Sociology and Social Sciences, followed by the “Das politische Buch” (The Political Book) prize endowed by the Bonn-based Friedrich Ebert Foundation in 1999. In 2006, he was the winner of the Hegel Prize awarded by the city of Stuttgart and, in 2008, received Germany’s Gerda Henkel Prize, which recognizes outstanding scholarly achievement in the historical humanities.

This Press Release is in the following Topics:
Graduate School of Arts and Science

Type: Press Release

New York University Professor Richard Sennett

New York University Professor Richard Sennett


Search News



NYU In the News

NYU Offers Financial Aid to Undocumented Students

The Wall Street Journal reported that NYU will begin offering scholarship aid to undocumented students for the school year beginning next September.

NYU Adopts Lean LaunchPad Program to Teach Entrepreneurship

Startup guru Steve Blank, in a Huffington Post blog, described how NYU adopted the Lean LaunchPad model to teach entrepreneurship to students and faculty at NYU.

Biology Professor Jane Carlton Examines Wastewater for the City’s Microbiome

The New York Times’ Science Times column “Well” profiled Biology Professor Jane Carlton and her research project to sequence microbiome of New York City by examining wastewater samples.

Steinhardt Professors Use a Play as Therapy

The New York Times wrote about a play written by Steinhardt Music Professor Robert Landy about the relationship between Adjunct Professor Cecilia Dintino, a clinical psychologist in the Drama Therapy Program, and a patient, former Broadway actress Jill Powell.

NYU Public Health Experts Urge Strengthening Local Health Systems to Combat Ebola

Dean Cheryl Healton of the Global Institute of Public Health and Public Health Professor Christopher Dickey wrote an op-ed in the Huffington Post saying international health agencies need to strengthen their presence in countries at the local level to prevent future ebola outbreaks.

NYU Footer