Supreme Court Decisions and Public Opinion Examined in New Book Co-Edited by NYU Political Scientist


Brown v. Board of Education. Roe v. Wade. Bush v. Gore. Hamdi v. Rumsfeld. With these and other high-impact rulings, the U.S. Supreme Court has placed itself at the center of many of the most important political controversies of our time. How do Americans respond to these decisions? Does the public accept the High Court as the final arbiter in the “Culture Wars”? Or do such rulings lead to a backlash in public opinion?

Brown v. Board of Education. Roe v. Wade. Bush v. Gore. Hamdi v. Rumsfeld. With these and other high-impact rulings, the U.S. Supreme Court has placed itself at the center of many of the most important political controversies of our time. How do Americans respond to these decisions? Does the public accept the High Court as the final arbiter in the “Culture Wars”? Or do such rulings lead to a backlash in public opinion?

In a book released this month, NYU political scientist Patrick J. Egan and his collaborators answer these vital questions about the impact of Supreme Court rulings on American public opinion. Public Opinion and Constitutional Controversy (Oxford University Press) traces the trajectory of public opinion on more than a dozen issues addressed by the Supreme Court-including desegregation, school prayer, abortion, the death penalty, affirmative action, gay rights, assisted suicide, and national security. Egan, an assistant professor in New York University’s Wilf Family Department of Politics, edited the book with Columbia University School of Law Professor Nathaniel Persily and Jack Citrin, a professor of political science at the University of California, Berkel 500

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