NYU's Institute for Education and Social Policy Releases Longitudinal Portrait of One NYC Public School Class


Fewer than four out of ten students had sequential grade promotion from first to eighth grade, report finds

The Institute for Education and Social Policy (IESP) at New York University this week released a report that suggests that, for the students who entered first grade in New York City public schools in the1995-96 school year, standard academic progress was the exception rather than the rule. The report, “From One to Eight: A Longitudinal Portrait of the First Grade Class of 1995-1996,” describes the academic pathways of more than 86,000 students during their first eight years in the New York City public school system. Using student-level data supplied by the New York City Department of Education, the researchers sought to answer such questions as: who stays and who leaves? Who is held back? And what are the outcomes for each of these groups?

Among the report’s findings are:

  • Less than six of ten students who enrolled in first grade in 1995-96 and were not in full-time special education, were still attending NYC public schools eight years later.
  • Fewer than four out of ten students had sequential grade promotion from first to eighth grade.
  • Almost one in ten students had been retained at least once.
  • Among exiting students, three out of ten had been retained or were enrolled one grade below their expected grade upon exit.
  • The proportion of white and Asian students among those 500

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