NYU, Tel Aviv University Create Non-Invasive Imaging Method for Diagnosing, Monitoring Osteoarthritis


Researchers at New York University and Tel Aviv University have developed a non-invasive imaging method that can be used to diagnose and monitor a number of diseases, including osteoarthritis and inter-vertebral disc degeneration, in their early stages. Their work appears in the latest issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

MRI of a knee. The measured Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration is indicative of the intactness of cartilage tissue.
MRI of a knee. The measured Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration is indicative of the intactness of cartilage tissue.

Embargoed For Release Until Feb. 11, 2008, 5 p.m., EST

Researchers at New York University and Tel Aviv University have developed a non-invasive imaging method that can be used to diagnose and monitor a number of diseases, including osteoarthritis and inter-vertebral disc degeneration, in their early stages. Their work appears in the latest issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

The research team examined glycosaminogycans (GAGs), which are molecules that serve as the building blocks of cartilage and are involved in numerous vital functions in the human body. Mapping the GAG concentration in vivo, or in a living organism, is desirable for the diagnosis and monitoring of a number of diseases. It is also valuable in determining the efficacy of drug therapies. For instance, GAG loss in cartilage typically marks the onset of osteoarthritis and inter-vertebral disc degeneration.

However, the existing techniques for GAG monitoring-based on 500

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