NYU Scientists to Discuss the Brain’s Circuitry and Effect On Political Ideology, Voting Behavior Roundtable at NYU On September 17, 2008


Recent research by three New York University faculty suggests political leanings are linked to brain biology. In this special event they discuss emotion s impact on learning and memory, how liberals and conservatives may handle mental conflict differently, and if there is a psychological basis for political ideology.

Sergio Leone s The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) movie evoked similar responses across all viewers in about 45 percent of the cortex during movie watching.
Sergio Leone s The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966) movie evoked similar responses across all viewers in about 45 percent of the cortex during movie watching.

Do your political decisions reflect conscious, reasoned choices-or are you liberal or conservative based on your neural circuitry? Recent research by three New York University faculty suggests political leanings are linked to brain biology. In this special event they discuss emotion’s impact on learning and memory, how liberals and conservatives may handle mental conflict differently, and if there is a psychological basis for political ideology.

  • WHAT: “The Neuroscience of Elections and Human Decision-Making: Find Out What Really Rocks Your Vote”
  • WHO: Elizabeth Phelps, Professor of Psychology, NYU; David Amodio, Associate Professor of Psychology, NYU; John Jost, Professor of Psychology, NYU
  • WHEN: Wednesday, September 17, 7-9 p.m.
  • WHERE: NYU’s Woolworth Building; 15 Barclay Street (between Broadway and Church St.); Subway: J, M, Z to Chambers St; 4, 5, 6 to Brooklyn Bridge-City Hall.

REGISTER: Cost is $20 ($10 for NYAS members, and N 500

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