NYU Brain Imaging Study Shows Those Closer To World Trade Center Have More Vivid Memories When Recalling 9/11


Those close to the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 have, on average, more vivid memories of the terrorist attacks than do those who were in other parts of New York City on that day, according to a study by researchers at New York University. The results, reported in the most recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, indicate personal involvement may be important in engaging the amygdala when recalling 9/11 events.

A satellite view of Manhattan showing ground zero (bottom left corner), the average location of the study's downtown group (circle 1), which had more vivid memories when recalling 9/11, and of the midtown group (circle 2).
A satellite view of Manhattan showing ground zero (bottom left corner), the average location of the study's downtown group (circle 1), which had more vivid memories when recalling 9/11, and of the midtown group (circle 2).

Those close to the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001 have, on average, more vivid memories of the terrorist attacks than do those who were in other parts of New York City on that day, according to a study by researchers at New York University. The results, reported in the most recent issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, indicate personal involvement may be important in engaging the amygdala when recalling 9/11 events. The amygdala is 500

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