NYU Study Reveals How Brain's Immune System Fights Viral Encephalitis

New York University biologists have uncovered how the innate immune system in mice’s brains fights viral infection of neurons. The findings, published as the cover study in the latest issue of Virology, show that proteins in neurons fight the virus at multiple stages-by preventing the formation of viral RNA and proteins, and blocking their release of virus which could infect other cells in the brain.

“There is no magic bullet in fighting viral infections in neurons,” said NYU Biology Professor Carol Shoshkes Reiss, the study’s senior author. “However, these findings show the redundancy of the immune system-when one response fails to fight infection, others step in.”

The study was also conducted at NYU, by a post-doctoral fellow, Mark Trottier, Jr., PhD, now at Michigan State, and Beth Palian, currently a doctoral student at the University of Southern California.

Recently, the West Nile virus has been responsible for a viral encephalitis outbreak in the northeast. The NYU researchers set out to determine how the body can fight viral encephalitis. Specifically, they examined how type I inter 500

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