Carol Klaperman Morrow is Vice Provost. In this role, she provides support for the Provost’s initiatives and priorities, and represents the Provost to School Deans and administrative offices. She is the senior officer of the University responsible to the Provost for matters involving dean searches and faculty appointments, and serves as the Provost’s liaison to the Schools on faculty matters. She has responsibility for the Office of Academic Appointments, which administers the University’s policies governing academic appointments on behalf of the Provost and the President; and works closely with the Office of General Counsel on faculty issues. She is the Provost’s representative to the Faculty Senators Councils and provides administrative oversight for the Office of Faculty Governance. She also provides leadership in formulating and promulgating academic policies, advises on the interpretation of policies in the Faculty Handbook, and serves as steward of the Faculty Handbook.

Dr. Morrow has worked at NYU since 1982. Prior to joining the Provost's Office in 2006, Dr. Morrow served as Associate Dean for Science in the Faculty of Arts and Science. Previously at FAS, she was Assistant Dean for Science, Director of Science Planning, and Director of Administrative Policy Studies and Funded Research. Before joining FAS, she conducted policy research in what was then the University offices of the Vice Chancellor and of the Vice President for Administration.

Dr. Morrow received her B.A. in Sociology from Barnard College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and graduated summa cum laude, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Sociology from New York University. She is the author of Health Care Guidance: Commercial Health Insurance and National Health Policy (Praeger Special Studies, 1976), and articles on professional self-governance, including "Sick doctors: The social construction of professional deviance" (Social Problems, 30:1, October 1982), and “'Doctors helping doctors: How the profession treats impairment" (The Hastings Center Report , 14:6, December 1984).